I have nothing, nothing, nothing, if I dont have the interwebs.

Last Saturday I dropped my iPhone 4 in the toilet. I pulled the ol” phone in the back of my jeans pocket thang. Despite my best efforts to revive my beloved gadget (including three nights resting in a zip locked bag of brown rice), it never returned to life.

I spent most of the afternoon in mourning. I could not check the time, check in to a location, claim back mayorship of my favourite cafe or update my Twitter feed every ten minutes. The actual loss of voice and text did not cross my mind until the next day.

I was surprisingly relaxed by my lack of connectivity over the next four days. I lost the compulsion to engage in my hyper-connected lifestyle.

If you build it, they will come 

The term, “If you build it, [they] will come” reigns true with me because every morning at 5am, I:

  1. Turn off my alarm
  2. Check my email
  3. Check Twitter for iPhone for notifications

These actions have become second nature. Etched in stone after four years of daily smart phone usage.

On Sunday it occurred to me I could only be contacted via Twitter or Facebook. This left me chained to my apartment and it”s Wi-Fi connection while I made plans for the afternoon.

I soldiered on for an entire business day. With my email and Twitter only a click away I felt that there was no need for a mobile phone. I then remembered something that I was expecting an important call from the office. Working client side, I did not have the access to my landline extension. With that in mind, I caved the next morning, walked into the Optus store and placed the microsim into an iPhone 3G.

Return of the 3G

I turned on the iPhone 3G and it could not connect to the internet! I was immediately agitated. I could not even find a post office in the middle of the city with a bud because of my lack of Google Maps. For me, it was on like Donkey Kong!

Sans iPhone 4, the lack of interconnected left me refreshed and relaxed. I did not feel the need to be instantly contactable. However, as soon as the iPhone 3G returned I could not bear the thought that I would be unable to return to my previous compulsive behaviour.

Is this some form of psychological warfare? Without my phone I am content. With my whack iPhone 3G I simply feel disconnected.

So, I bare the question – when did it become all or nothing with technology?

 

Reading Something Country #2

Written by Larry Cordle and Larry Shell, “Murder On Music Row” is a critique of the continuing craze of country-pop ‘crossover’ acts, suggesting that the coarse nature and authenticity of the genre have been abandoned, resulting in its symbolic murder:

They never found the fingerprints
Or the weapon that was used
But someone killed country music
Cut out its heart and soul
They got away with murder
Down on music row

(“Murder On Music Row”, Cordle and Shell, 1999).